24 Apr 2009 @ 10:34 PM 

Day 4 – Last day of the conference. I’ve got a lot to say, I hope you’re buckled in.

Interesting stuff today – my sessions started off on the practical level: Water and its Uses in the Brewhouse, and Oak Barrel Aging. Both good, the latter was especially fascinating, especially since I would like to do a fair amount of barrel again myself. I would have liked to hear him speak a little more to sour beers, but it’s just not as hot in the market as spirit-flavored stuff right now, so I understand the focus.

The afternoon held another “women and beer” session, this time by Ginger Johnson – a marketeer and beer appreciator – but (importantly) not a brewer. She was great. She was energetic, and she was peppy, and she had a message that I (mostly) agreed with focusing on education and social interaction. I spent the entire session writing down quotes, let me pass a few onto you. She started off by nothing that she was talking about women as a market segment, not as an issue. “Gender is a difference, not an inequality” she said and “Women are not a niche or a special initiative.” Yeah! I’m not sure she always stuck to this, but it was good to start with. I mean, you don’t start a women-only beer tasting group without it being somewhat of special initiative – after all, it’s women-only and it would seem that you’re doing it for a purpose, there.. The problem is, once you treat women as a different segment, you’re automatically create an inequality. If you say, “Women taste things differently” you’ve created an inequality (and I still don’t buy that shit. In fact. Let me make an aside:)

An aside:

I’ve heard this mentioned like 5 times in the past two days: “Women taste things differently than men.” Someone at the first panel mentioned that there had been some sort of study that showed that women have a better ability to detect acids than men do and some other incremental difference. So does that mean that women taste things differently than men? Yeah, sure. If what you’re trying to do is compare, on a minute level, the differences between palates. But here’s the thing: If I drink an IPA and my wife drinks an IPA, we are both drinking the same beer. I might love it and she might hate it (she’s not a hophead), but it’s not because she’s tasting it differently than I am, it’s because she doesn’t enjoy the hops. People taste differently than other people. It’s not because she’s a women, it’s because she has a different set of life experiences behind her taste preferences. However! What she tastes as an IPA is essentially exactly the same as what I’m tasting as an IPA since the only thing either of us have to compare it against is our own experiences with flavor. There is no possible way I can experience the beer as it is on her palate, so an incremental difference between us is inconsequential. Maybe this leans a little too far to philosophy, but the way I see it is this: If I start at point A and she starts 5 feet away from me, and we both walk three miles the only difference between us is our individual experience on a very slightly different path. We both walked 3 miles. Poor analogy, maybe, but it’s my standpoint.

Back to topic:

The thing that Ginger said that really rang true to me was, “It’s about real women, not about feminizing to sexualizing something … Treat them like the consumers you want them to be.” Hear-freakin’-hear. This goes back to my theory (which I will repeat again and again and again): You want women to drink good beer? Make good beer.

She brought up some sort of .. statistic or something. Un-cited it makes me a little nervous, I think she said she got this out of focus groups (and I also distrust focus groups.. so.. meh… it’s okay). What she said was: Women have higher standards than men. If you meet the woman’s expectations, you will generally exceed the man’s expectation. It sounds reasonable – though it does kind of fly in the face of “Gender is a difference, not an inequality.” I can’t say that I love that I might have lower standards for my beer than my wife. I like to think that we have different expectations, not that mine are lower. She might love a sweet malty beer and I might love a sour funky one. Those aren’t better or worse, or higher or lower or whatever. They’re different.

Aaaanyway (I’m clearly rambling today), the point is this: IF that’s true (which – in a general, population-level sense, sounds right) then finding this missed market segment is easy. But let’s say it this way: You want women to drink good beer? Make good beer.

Last session of the day was fun: Beer on the Web with Jason and Todd Alstrom, Jay Brookston and Joni Denyes from Odell Brewing. From my perspective, it was fun – not anything I didn’t know, but nice to relax and listen to something that I’m really familiar with. At the same time that the actual panel was going on, there was a sub-discussion going on on Twitter which was both serious and actually quite funny. Take a look at a Twitter search for #cbc09 and just scroll back oh.. hell.. probably a couple of hundred pages by this time, to see the chatter flow. For the record, and thank you Sean from Fullsteam for worrying my wife as she followed along on Twitter from home: My fly was up.

I think the only issues that I had was the panel were these:

1) It would have been nice to have a computer set up to the projector in the Amphitheater with a connection to the internet to actually demonstrate some of this technology. Unfortunately, while there were a bunch of people in the room who were very tech savvy and willing to discuss this technology, there were also a bunch who were essentially asking, “What’s the Tweeter? Is that on the Google now?” It would have been nice to have a way of displaying the technology that people were talking about – maybe having Jay’s blog and Beer Advocate up online, as well as O’Dell’s twitter, MySpace, and Facebook pages – it definitely would have required a longer session, though. Maybe next year, it’s a session that’s worth repeating.

2) I was a little irked about Jay Brookston’s comments about amateur bloggers. I’m trying not to take umbrage because I’ve so recently started pouring my head onto this blog, and look at this objectively. Fact is this: In a way, we are all amateur bloggers. The internet is a relatively young invention, and blogs moreso. Five years ago, we couldn’t have this conversation. So have professional bloggers risen overnight? I don’t think so. Maybe you had professional writers who have decided to move their content online, but that doesn’t make them any less amateur in the medium. I see where Jay is going – not everybody who runs a blog is serious about writing or serious about their subject matter. Jay has the advantage of being an established writer and having a good history in the beer industry. He also happens to be both tech savvy and a fantasic author – and this gives him a decided edge.

However, everybody has to start somewhere. Just because somebody is new or small doesn’t mean that they’re unprofessional or not good at what they’re doing. Good god – if that were the case, would we even have a craft brew industry? The point I hope Jay was trying to make was that – just because someone is running a blog doesn’t mean that they’re willing to approach it intelligently and that YOU, both as a business owner and a consumer of content, have to take the time to decide whether or not this person is worth spending your valuable time and attention. There’s little-to-no cost of entry involved in starting a blog, and because of that there is definitely a high level of jack-assery. Don’t take their existence as a credential, take the time to investigate them for yourself (or find someone you trust who has the time to do it for you).

So there’s my spiel to stop me from being an amateur, and actually make me someone awesome who is still trying to ping the radar. 🙂

Because.. hey.. I’m awesome right? And modest, too. Don’t forget modest.

All in all? Awesome week. I got to meet some great people, some who were just starting breweries and some who have been in the business for a long, long time. I got a lot of good perspectives and have come away inspired and hungry for more. I’m not gonna lie, it’s gonna be really difficult to head back to the 9-5 next week. I’m ready to start NOW.

Next year, the conference is in Chicago and I plan to attend with my wife and my (hopefully eventual) COO in tow to flesh out details of the business. Until then, there will probably be occasional mention of startup stuff here on the blog, but I’ll most likely focus on beer, breweries, as much industry stuff as I can dig up to keep myself engaged and moving forward.

I hope you’ll join me on the ride.

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Categories: blog, Brewers Association, industry, media
Posted By: erik
Last Edit: 20 May 2009 @ 07 06 AM

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