07 Jul 2011 @ 3:10 PM 

Among other things, I consider myself somewhat of a feminist.

I know, I know. It might seem a little contradictory because I own a penis, but trust me: I’m all for equality among the sexes. Some of the most important people in my life are women and I want to see them treated fairly and, frankly, like people rather than some mystical, mysterious demographic. When I see something that I consider sexist, I tend to get up in arms. Unfortunately, I don’t really have the vagina uterus credentials to do it properly, and I’ve been known to get up in arms about things that I might be a little idealistic about, so there’s your warning for the rest of this article.

One of the first things I saw this morning via Twitter was this tweet referring to an blog post over on Smart Bitches about a “scientific” article about romance novels that was, essentially, very sexist toward women. The assumptions of said scientific article are basically long-perpetuated stereotypes about women and romance (and I won’t even get into the dodgy sampling/research).

That should give you a little bit of an idea about the kind of reading I do on a daily basis. Hi. I’m a complex individual.

Then, as I was trolling through Twitter this afternoon I came across a little discussion about Chick Beer.

Go ahead and click on that link, swallow a little bile, and come back. I’ll wait.

Got your eyes adjusted away from the pinksplosion? Right on.

I don’t even know where to begin with this. No – strike that, I do. I can start back about two years ago with the BitterSweet Partnership. (“Finally, a beer just for women!” – Nice market research!) Yeah-huh. This isn’t the first beer for women, but it does make the same basic assumptions:

Women are delicate creatures that need to be coddled. They can’t possibly determine what kind of beer they like out of such a complex array on the shelves, because hey: learning is hard! Not to mention, we all know that beer makes you fat, so slow down girl! You want something low in calories, low in carbonation, low in bloat! Something pink!

It’s the same damn thing as that article above. It’s women perpetuating ridiculous and insulting stereotypes about… women!

Here. Let me describe a beer for you that I think sounds disgusting. Women who read my blog, please let me know if you think this beer sounds appealing:

A slightly flat Light American lager.

Whooo-hoo! Can we serve it warm, too?

Does it sound more appealing if you know the six-pack looks chic, like you’re carrying a cute little purse? What about that the label is shiny? How do you think the six-pack carrier or label will change the flavor? Please frame your answer using as few expletives as possible.

Here’s the way I see it: If women really truly want a choice in beer that suits their taste and style, there are 1700+ craft breweries in the country to choose from and I guarantee that many of them will make something that suits someone’s individual taste and style … assuming they like beer. And if they don’t like beer? I suggest starting there instead of something they’ve probably already tried: slightly flat Light American Lager.

Where does this crap come from? Haven’t we been able to move past this in the industry? Women drink beer. A lot of women drink beer. And if my experience has taught me anything what they like is robust, flavorful beer. Not something designed for their delicate sensibilities, but ones that they enjoy because.. oh.. they like the taste of it, not because it comes in some fancy, shiny, carrying case.

It’s an exemplary example of something that I really like to argue: That when you separate women as a social group, regardless of your intent, you are being inherently sexist. What the underlying assumption to all of this is, is that women have to be treated differently than men. I see the intent: You want something that women will enjoy, that will make them feel special, etc. – but that underlying assumption, while well-intentioned, is also what allows this incredibly short-sighted and sexist example and will continue to provide many more as long as people continue to treat women as though they are inherently NOT people.

As a lot of people have said on the internets already today: I hope this is a joke. I hope this is designed as satire. But I doubt it.

Sorry, ladies. You’ll just have to drink it. After all, it’s designed just for you.

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Posted By: erik
Last Edit: 07 Jul 2011 @ 04 19 PM

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 13 May 2009 @ 8:17 AM 

Tiny Spoiler alert: If you have not seen J.J. Abrams’s Star Trek reboot yet and care wildly about a throwaway line about 20 minutes into the film, you may want to stop reading now, but I promise that this post is actually about beer.

Behold this scene. Kirk meets Uhura in a bar. Aww. They’re… like.. kids! How cool! The whole clip lasts just a minute and doesn’t give away anything about the film if you haven’t seen it yet. Go ahead. Watch it. I’ll wait.

Fun, eh? “That’s a lot of drinks for one woman!” Nice pickup line, Jim. It’s hard to imagine that you actually do get all the girls. I’ll tell you what, though. I barely noticed it the first time through; the mention of three “Bud Classics” nearly took me out of my seat.

For years, sci-fi has been responsible for motivating the minds of inventors and that is particularly true for Star Trek. There’s a reason that there are cell phones that look a lot like the communicators you see in Star Trek. There’s a reason that there are actually scientists working on matter transference. One person thought it up in their wildest dreams and a fanboy scientist somewhere that actually knew his shit about physics said, “Holy shit. I bet I can do that.” I hope that, instead, this is one of those instances where 30 years from now I have to explain that reference to the younger generations.

“See.. back in the early part of the 21st Century, our country – in fact, our world – was dominated by just a couple of major beer companies that made some really bland stuff but were incredibly powerful. At that point, the companies had been around for 150 years or more and it seemed like there was nothing anybody could do to crack the market beyond a really specific 10% or so. This ‘Budweiser’ was one of them. Of course, that was back before we ran out of oil and the megabreweries couldn’t figure out how to ship 200 million barrels of beer quickly and cheaply and business started shifting back to local taverns.”

Bud Classic? Really? I mean.. I get the throwaway joke. It’s like Coke, Coke Classic, etc. It’s in the future. They’re in a bar. Bud Classic. A-ha-ha-ha. I also know from an interview with Jimmy Kimmel (start at 5:36) that the engine room of the Enterprise was actually Budweiser’s factory, so you probably felt like you had to throw in a little product placement. But you know what? There are a lot of beer factories out there with lots of rooms with lots of pipes that aren’t A-B that would have been equally as good, and those vats wouldn’t have been filled with Bud Light, they would have been filled with Awesome. A “Sam Adams Classic” might have been a really great touch, actually.

I do appreciate that you’ve got a woman – and what’s more, a black woman – coming in and ordering a beer (and a shot of bourbon!). Uhura has frequently been cited as a source of inspiration to others. People have called her a role model. We can only hope that this reinvention of the character will continue to follow suit! But… a Bud Classic?

“I don’t want none of that fancy new beer! You get me a Bud like they made it back in the good ol’ days in the 20th Century!”

Can you imagine a future in which our tastes as a species are so unrefined as to hearken back to old Budweiser?

No! I refuse to believe in a future in which the dominant beverages, even in a dive bar in Iowa outside of a landside space station, are Bud Classic and Slusho Mix. Jack? Okay. I’m fine with that. (I’ll have a taste of that 150-year, thanks!) But I refuse to believe that in a future where space travel is possible we, as a society, are so damned pedestrian.

You hear me, Abrams? You could have put anything in there! She could have said “I’ll have the Nendefarian SPACE Ale!” and I wouldn’t have thought twice about it, but feed me a line about Bud Classic and I start seeing your future in a much more Blade Runner-esque “it’s always dark and foggy and rainy” kind of way. That future isn’t a beacon of progress and a place of peace where anything is possible, but one where we’re finally mindless drone minions to our corporate overlords.

I reject this bleak vision of our drinking future. My future holds great beer. Besides, in a real future Iowa, it probably should have been Dos Equis Classico.

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Posted By: erik
Last Edit: 13 May 2009 @ 09 24 AM

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 24 Apr 2009 @ 10:34 PM 

Day 4 – Last day of the conference. I’ve got a lot to say, I hope you’re buckled in.

Interesting stuff today – my sessions started off on the practical level: Water and its Uses in the Brewhouse, and Oak Barrel Aging. Both good, the latter was especially fascinating, especially since I would like to do a fair amount of barrel again myself. I would have liked to hear him speak a little more to sour beers, but it’s just not as hot in the market as spirit-flavored stuff right now, so I understand the focus.

The afternoon held another “women and beer” session, this time by Ginger Johnson – a marketeer and beer appreciator – but (importantly) not a brewer. She was great. She was energetic, and she was peppy, and she had a message that I (mostly) agreed with focusing on education and social interaction. I spent the entire session writing down quotes, let me pass a few onto you. She started off by nothing that she was talking about women as a market segment, not as an issue. “Gender is a difference, not an inequality” she said and “Women are not a niche or a special initiative.” Yeah! I’m not sure she always stuck to this, but it was good to start with. I mean, you don’t start a women-only beer tasting group without it being somewhat of special initiative – after all, it’s women-only and it would seem that you’re doing it for a purpose, there.. The problem is, once you treat women as a different segment, you’re automatically create an inequality. If you say, “Women taste things differently” you’ve created an inequality (and I still don’t buy that shit. In fact. Let me make an aside:)

An aside:

I’ve heard this mentioned like 5 times in the past two days: “Women taste things differently than men.” Someone at the first panel mentioned that there had been some sort of study that showed that women have a better ability to detect acids than men do and some other incremental difference. So does that mean that women taste things differently than men? Yeah, sure. If what you’re trying to do is compare, on a minute level, the differences between palates. But here’s the thing: If I drink an IPA and my wife drinks an IPA, we are both drinking the same beer. I might love it and she might hate it (she’s not a hophead), but it’s not because she’s tasting it differently than I am, it’s because she doesn’t enjoy the hops. People taste differently than other people. It’s not because she’s a women, it’s because she has a different set of life experiences behind her taste preferences. However! What she tastes as an IPA is essentially exactly the same as what I’m tasting as an IPA since the only thing either of us have to compare it against is our own experiences with flavor. There is no possible way I can experience the beer as it is on her palate, so an incremental difference between us is inconsequential. Maybe this leans a little too far to philosophy, but the way I see it is this: If I start at point A and she starts 5 feet away from me, and we both walk three miles the only difference between us is our individual experience on a very slightly different path. We both walked 3 miles. Poor analogy, maybe, but it’s my standpoint.

Back to topic:

The thing that Ginger said that really rang true to me was, “It’s about real women, not about feminizing to sexualizing something … Treat them like the consumers you want them to be.” Hear-freakin’-hear. This goes back to my theory (which I will repeat again and again and again): You want women to drink good beer? Make good beer.

She brought up some sort of .. statistic or something. Un-cited it makes me a little nervous, I think she said she got this out of focus groups (and I also distrust focus groups.. so.. meh… it’s okay). What she said was: Women have higher standards than men. If you meet the woman’s expectations, you will generally exceed the man’s expectation. It sounds reasonable – though it does kind of fly in the face of “Gender is a difference, not an inequality.” I can’t say that I love that I might have lower standards for my beer than my wife. I like to think that we have different expectations, not that mine are lower. She might love a sweet malty beer and I might love a sour funky one. Those aren’t better or worse, or higher or lower or whatever. They’re different.

Aaaanyway (I’m clearly rambling today), the point is this: IF that’s true (which – in a general, population-level sense, sounds right) then finding this missed market segment is easy. But let’s say it this way: You want women to drink good beer? Make good beer.

Last session of the day was fun: Beer on the Web with Jason and Todd Alstrom, Jay Brookston and Joni Denyes from Odell Brewing. From my perspective, it was fun – not anything I didn’t know, but nice to relax and listen to something that I’m really familiar with. At the same time that the actual panel was going on, there was a sub-discussion going on on Twitter which was both serious and actually quite funny. Take a look at a Twitter search for #cbc09 and just scroll back oh.. hell.. probably a couple of hundred pages by this time, to see the chatter flow. For the record, and thank you Sean from Fullsteam for worrying my wife as she followed along on Twitter from home: My fly was up.

I think the only issues that I had was the panel were these:

1) It would have been nice to have a computer set up to the projector in the Amphitheater with a connection to the internet to actually demonstrate some of this technology. Unfortunately, while there were a bunch of people in the room who were very tech savvy and willing to discuss this technology, there were also a bunch who were essentially asking, “What’s the Tweeter? Is that on the Google now?” It would have been nice to have a way of displaying the technology that people were talking about – maybe having Jay’s blog and Beer Advocate up online, as well as O’Dell’s twitter, MySpace, and Facebook pages – it definitely would have required a longer session, though. Maybe next year, it’s a session that’s worth repeating.

2) I was a little irked about Jay Brookston’s comments about amateur bloggers. I’m trying not to take umbrage because I’ve so recently started pouring my head onto this blog, and look at this objectively. Fact is this: In a way, we are all amateur bloggers. The internet is a relatively young invention, and blogs moreso. Five years ago, we couldn’t have this conversation. So have professional bloggers risen overnight? I don’t think so. Maybe you had professional writers who have decided to move their content online, but that doesn’t make them any less amateur in the medium. I see where Jay is going – not everybody who runs a blog is serious about writing or serious about their subject matter. Jay has the advantage of being an established writer and having a good history in the beer industry. He also happens to be both tech savvy and a fantasic author – and this gives him a decided edge.

However, everybody has to start somewhere. Just because somebody is new or small doesn’t mean that they’re unprofessional or not good at what they’re doing. Good god – if that were the case, would we even have a craft brew industry? The point I hope Jay was trying to make was that – just because someone is running a blog doesn’t mean that they’re willing to approach it intelligently and that YOU, both as a business owner and a consumer of content, have to take the time to decide whether or not this person is worth spending your valuable time and attention. There’s little-to-no cost of entry involved in starting a blog, and because of that there is definitely a high level of jack-assery. Don’t take their existence as a credential, take the time to investigate them for yourself (or find someone you trust who has the time to do it for you).

So there’s my spiel to stop me from being an amateur, and actually make me someone awesome who is still trying to ping the radar. 🙂

Because.. hey.. I’m awesome right? And modest, too. Don’t forget modest.

All in all? Awesome week. I got to meet some great people, some who were just starting breweries and some who have been in the business for a long, long time. I got a lot of good perspectives and have come away inspired and hungry for more. I’m not gonna lie, it’s gonna be really difficult to head back to the 9-5 next week. I’m ready to start NOW.

Next year, the conference is in Chicago and I plan to attend with my wife and my (hopefully eventual) COO in tow to flesh out details of the business. Until then, there will probably be occasional mention of startup stuff here on the blog, but I’ll most likely focus on beer, breweries, as much industry stuff as I can dig up to keep myself engaged and moving forward.

I hope you’ll join me on the ride.

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Posted By: erik
Last Edit: 20 May 2009 @ 07 06 AM

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 23 Apr 2009 @ 11:20 PM 

Day 3 didn’t start out very well for me, mainly because Day 2 ended so well. Turns out that at the end of Day 2, I forgot to eat dinner. It took me a little while to get out of bed this morning. Heh.

But get out of bed I did! And I had another fantastic day.

First off, I mentioned yesterday that I was hoping that the movie that Greg Koch showed at the beginning of the keynote would be available on line, and it most certainly is. View at your pleasure, it is truly awesome. I think it actually brought a tear of pride to my eye.


I Am A Craft Brewer.

Today, I had lunch with a good friend of mine who’s working as an indie video game developer. He’s in the process of starting up his own company, very much in the same way I’m working on starting up mine – he’s a little ahead of me on the track, but in comparing notes about the industries, we found remarkable similarities. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that these are both comparatively young industries. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that they’re both rooted in passion, or that they’re both working full time against lowest-common-denominator preconceptions. Hard to say, but we were a little surprised that we felt like we had so much in common when the two end products felt like they weren’t related at all. He’s got a deadline coming up in a couple of weeks, so I won’t push now, but we’re looking at – in the future – doing an industry comparison across our sites so that we can fully explore the similarities. The way my mind sees it is that we might see some really unlikely partnerships bloom sometime in the future.

After lunch, I attended the panel Beer According to Women: How Women Brew, Present, Pair and Sell Beer. The panel was moderated by Sebbie Buhler of Rogue, full panel was Candice Alstrom of Beer Advocate, Teri Fahrendorf – Road Brewer and founder of the Pink Boots Society, and Jodi Stoudt of Stoudts Brewing Co. Really fantastic panel, with a good range of opinions. There’s a list of questions and answers laying around somewhere on the internet that I need to dig up and post here so that I don’t have to reiterate the entire panel. For the most part, the panel agreed with my feeling on the matter: How do you get women to drink good beer? You make good beer. The key word that all of the panelists emphasized was “balance” and I might argue that that’s important for every beer drinker, not just women.

In fact, I found myself thinking, almost across the board, that any of the good points about how to reach women really applied to men equally and that bringing gender into the equation really made things more complicated than they were. What I found most interesting is that there seems to be a bit of an age divide on this issue. It was evident right away in the panel, the first question asked was: Does gender matter? While 2 out of the 3 panelists said “No” (my position), one said “Yes” and continued to return to the point throughout the entire panel. I hesitate to use the world “older” to describe her because the age difference between 99% of the people in this industry is not that wide and “older” sounds like I’m saying “elder,” and I don’t want to give that impression. We’re talking maybe 10 years, here, both in age and in experience in the industry. However, it is enough, I think, for traditional stances on feminism to change significantly. It’s a tricky subject. What is clear to me is that while we might be talking about this now, we’re going to be talking about it completely differently in a few years and my theory is that we won’t be talking about it at all after a small time. Why? Because craft brewers continue to get better at their craft, they continue to put good beer out in front of consumers and in time the women will drink it as equally as the men.

The second panel I went to was Keeping it Real: Brewery Owner Perspectives. Moderated by Sam Calagione of Dogfish Head, the panel consisted of Larry Bell of Bell’s Brewery, Kim Jordan of New Belgium, David Walker of Firestone Walker, and Rob Todd of Allagash. It was phenomenal. The entire panel was anecdotal. Managerial advice took the form of stories about the startup years of each brewery, how they found their vision, when they had to finally delegate responsibilities, how they manage distribution, etc. It was funny and warming and is one of those times (like the video above) that I feel really warm about becoming part of this industry.

The only question that I felt wasn’t particularly well addressed was one by Scott Metzger of Freetail Brewing. He mentioned that a lot of the people up on the stage were in his homestate of Texas through large A-B and MillerCoors distributors and that those distributors actively choke out local Texas beers due to their current legal restriction on self-distribution. David Walker responded something along the lines of, “Hang in there, it will all be okay, things are changing.” which is probably accurate, but Scott’s point remains valid. All of these guys can say to their distributors – don’t take tap handles or shelf space away from other craft beers to put my product in, and that might be agreed upon from a managerial standpoint in the distributor, but the local guy who’s actually going into package stores or supermarkets or dive bars or whatever might not give a shit, and that’s where local breweries are going to get hit the hardest. When something of similar quality to their product comes in from elsewhere and has the advantage of being a well-known brand – a Sam Adams, a Dogfish Head, a New Belgium, etc. – and the local rep won’t follow through on the intention of the regional brewer.

Kim Jordan might not have wanted to take tap handles away when Fat Tire came into North Carolina, but I see it in bars everywhere now and I can assure you that the tap handle that came down to put Fat Tire on was almost definitely NOT A-B or Coors.

So Scott’s question, in my mind, is: When a large regional brewery starts to become a threat to local brands due to the unscrupulous actions of their distributor: what do we do?

I don’t know the answer to that question, and I think it’s going to be a tough one to answer until the three-tier system is better regulated, but it’s interesting to think about.

I, unfortunately, did not make it to the Cask event at Harpoon tonight, though I had originally planned to. I ended up meeting up with my old roommate and fantastic friend at dining (again) at the Cambridge Brewing Company. Harissa Rubbed Lamb Steak paired with Gruit? That’s the kind of meal people write about. Heh. I just wrote about it. Awesome.

Tomorrow? More women and beer and the sad conclusion of the conference.

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Posted By: erik
Last Edit: 23 Apr 2009 @ 11 28 PM

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 02 Apr 2009 @ 9:59 AM 

Yesterday, I was lucky enough to get a response on my post about the Bittersweet Partnership from what would appear to be Kristy McReady, Communications Partner, whose job it is to “engage with consumers via press and the website to help raise awareness of women and beer as an issue and ultimately BitterSweet Partnership’s aims to address it.”

Meet Kristy!

Meet Kristy!

Which, well.. well done, Kristy. Mission accomplished… sorta.

For those of you just tuning in, here is the text of the post:

Kristy from BitterSweet here – thanks for picking up on the story.

The BitterSweet Partnership was launched as we believe that the beer industry has ignored women for far too long. We know that lots of women already love beer, but our research showed that almost 8 out of 10 women (77%) say they seldom or never drink it,.

The ‘clear beer’ is a completely new, ultra filtered beer product which is still in development and has yet to be launched or even named. We’re listening to all women to understand what they want from a beer, so this is just one product that we’re currently testing – we’re looking at product developments to match a whole range of tastes, plus creating better buying and drinking experiences for women. We’ll also be working with Coors Brewers to help inform the way Coors brands generally engage with women in the future.

We’re about making beer an acceptable and stylish drink choice for women, not about encouraging women to drink more – we strongly recommend that women stick to government guidelines on safe drinking.

I want to say that I think it’s admirable that the Bittersweet Partnership has taken the time to search Twitter and respond to blogs about this. I do wish that the response didn’t seem so … canned. I really do hope that it was Kristy doing this and not some minion on Kristy’s name. That would make me feel good. Given that Kristy is supposed to be in the UK and the post came in at 5:07 PM EDT (or 10:07 PM GMT), I’m not so sure, but I’m willing to give them (her?) the benefit of the doubt. [Note: The IP address checks out to a UK cable internet provider, so.. hey.. cool.]

Dear Kristy,

Thank you. I appreciate your input. I’d like to respond to your post in a few ways.

First, I’d like to point out that stating research statistics without a reference or any sort of methods is a bit tough to swallow. I’m not disagreeing with the finding, as I don’t find it necessarily surprising, but I see nothing here about who you asked, how you asked it, or why said women seldom or never drink beer, or even if you were merely asking about Coors products or beer in general. As a counterpoint, my research clearly shows that 83% (5 out of 6) of women drink beer but that 40% of those surveyed would prefer more elegant presentation in pub/club settings.

Furthermore, I think we need to redefine your terms a bit in order to get the real message from your post. I’d like to change “brewing industry” to “Coors” and “beer” to “Coors Product(s)” to give the content a little more perspective.

I think that there are a lot of women in the brewing industry who would be surprised to find out that they’re ignoring (other) women. In fact, the brewing industry as a whole isn’t ignoring women at all. Within the past couple of years, women’s relationship to beer has been a constant topic in the craft beer industry. There have been articles about it in trade magazines and it has a panel dedicated to it at the upcoming Craft Beer Conference. Marketing beer to women is part of improving the image of beer as a whole, especially in its relationship to wine and cocktails.

If we can change that sentence to “…we believe that Coors has ignored women for far too long…” then I think we have something more specific. It’s something that I can’t really speak to, as I don’t know enough about the inner working of Coors, but it’s something that you can speak to. You’re in the position to change that!

I have issues with the ultra-clear tea-and-fruit-flavored “beer” because I think at that point you’re changing the product. You might be selling beer by a very technical definition, but rather than helping your market segment understand why they should be buying your product, you’re changing your product for your market segment. Again, if we change “beer” to “Coors Product” I have a lot less issue with this. You’re creating a Coors Product that will appeal to a market segment? Awesome. Good luck with that. But let’s call an alcopop an alcopop.

The one area that I think is a great point in this post is the brief mention of “creating better buying and drinking experiences for women.” As a commenter mentioned yesterday, it can be difficult to be elegant while swigging beer out of a bottle. While most of the beer bars that I frequent have rather elegant glassware to choose from, that certainly is not the case for most common establishments, especially if we are focusing on (as I think we are in this case) specifically pub culture. That is where Coors, and by extension, the Bittersweet Partnership has the power to change a lot.

Craft brewers, because they still only command a very small market share, don’t have the kind of influence to be able to say to your normal dive bar, “you will serve our beer in this manner in this glassware.” At this point it’s still difficult to get a majority of places to carry a product and keep their tap lines clean, much less serve beer in special glasses. Coors, and other megabreweries, however are in the position of being able to dictate these conditions to and through their distributors.

Mmm.. wheaty.

Mmm.. wheaty.


By now, I think we all know that Blue Moon is a Coors product, and word is that we’re about to see a huge spike in marketing dollars pushed at the brand. If you put money toward providing specialized glassware for it and distributing it to every upscale sports bar in the U.S. that carries Blue Moon, instead of some strained television commercial that plays alongside truck ads during baseball games, I pretty much guarantee that you see an uptick in sales.

In summary: Bittersweet, I don’t disagree with what you’re doing, or that there’s a problem with how beer, as a product, is related to women, but I do disagree with your tactic in addressing it. It is broad generalization of the beer industry, broad generalization of women, and borders on willful misinformation as a backbone for a marketing campaign.

I look forward to trying and reviewing your ultra-clear “beer.”

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Posted By: erik
Last Edit: 02 Apr 2009 @ 12 38 PM

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